Mind the booze if you want a good snooze

Posted on November 2, 2017 in Uncategorized - 0
partying

By Kathryn Smith, Clinical Psychologist, Psychology Consultants

Silly season is just around the corner and for many of us this means kicking off the heels and having a bit of fun. In essence, this means more food, more booze and less sleep. Sounds like a recipe for disaster, right…for some, it absolutely can be.

At risk of sounding like a major kill joy, alcohol is very bad for sleep health, coupled with decadent festive food and a change in evening routine and you’ve got the trifecta of sleep inhibitors. But like all things in life, moderation is the key and one or two bad night’s sleep is not the end of the world, especially if you had fun in the process. In fact, stressing about sleep, is the very opposite of what we preach through our insomnia program ‘Towards Better Sleep’. It is, however, important to recognise, that if you are already struggling with your sleep, be prepared to accept that the festive period may bring some additional challenges.

Contrary to popular belief, alcohol does not lead to the mother of all sleeps and this is due to a number of reasons. Whilst having a night cap, may help you drift off into la-la land, your slumber will be rudely interrupted, by an alcohol withdrawal effect. Alcohol has been known to prevent a deeper state of sleep and wakes us earlier than usual, throwing your sleep cycle out of whack. Combined with a higher than usual intake of sugar and fat, albeit via delicious festive treats, and you can kiss a good night’s sleep goodbye. Considering these nights as a bit of a write off, is a reasonable approach, as stressing about how you are going to feel and cope without sleep is counterproductive.

Burning the candles at both ends for weeks on end, however, is not our recommended guide to the festive season. Making some responsible drinking choices and carefully selecting which Christmas function you really want or need to attend, will give you some time to catch up on sleep and resume a healthier regime.  Keeping up the exercise, drinking plenty of water and otherwise eating a healthy diet will also help keep things in kilter.

After a long year of work, it’s important to take some time to rest, recoup and prepare for the new year ahead. Partying like its ‘99, might not be the best way to do so, with an inevitable full body burn out likely to prevail. Although, the festive period can be fun, it can also bring a great deal of stress with family and financial commitments and end of year work deadlines. Being kind to yourself by getting plenty of rest, taking time to reflect, plan and project, will do amazing things for your mind, body and soul.

If you liked this article, you might also like: 

http://psychologyconsultants.com.au/the-power-of-being-aware-of-your-thoughts/

http://psychologyconsultants.com.au/do-you-freak-out-without-your-phone/

 

 

 

 

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