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Did you know over 1.2 million Australian's suffer from a sleep disorder?

Posted on September 11, 2013 in Uncategorized - 0 comments - 0

If you form part of this statistic and would like to do something about it, our Towards Better Sleep group programme could be a dream come true! The next programme commences on 26th September at our Morningside practice. insomnia5

The sleep improvement programme has been effectively treating insomnia and other sleep disorders for over 10 years. It focuses on education, behavioural techniques, relaxation strategies and correcting faulty thinking.

By teaching practical methods and techniques to promote better sleep, past participants have reported significant improvements in their sleep behaviour and the way they think about sleep.

Experienced Clinical Psychologist Kathryn Smith and Sleep Specialist and Psychiatrist Dr Curt Gray facilitate the program that is held in groups of nine people or less.

A group setting has proven to be an effective way to treat sleep disorders by offering participants the opportunity to share their stories, and learn from the experiences and ideas of other insomnia sufferers. The setting still remains private and confidential but allows the therapist to treat patients in a more cost effective way.

A GP referral is required to participate in the programme, which costs $90 per session and is subject to a Medicare rebate.

If you are interested in participating in September programme, please phone our Newmarket office 07 3356 8255  or email tbs@psychologyconsultants.com.au to register your details and speak with your GP about a referral.

For more information visit http://towardsbettersleep.wordpress.com

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Did you know over 1.2 million Australian’s suffer from a sleep disorder?

Posted on September 11, 2013 in Uncategorized - 0 comments - 0

If you form part of this statistic and would like to do something about it, our Towards Better Sleep group programme could be a dream come true! The next programme commences on 26th September at our Morningside practice. insomnia5

The sleep improvement programme has been effectively treating insomnia and other sleep disorders for over 10 years. It focuses on education, behavioural techniques, relaxation strategies and correcting faulty thinking.

By teaching practical methods and techniques to promote better sleep, past participants have reported significant improvements in their sleep behaviour and the way they think about sleep.

Experienced Clinical Psychologist Kathryn Smith and Sleep Specialist and Psychiatrist Dr Curt Gray facilitate the program that is held in groups of nine people or less.

A group setting has proven to be an effective way to treat sleep disorders by offering participants the opportunity to share their stories, and learn from the experiences and ideas of other insomnia sufferers. The setting still remains private and confidential but allows the therapist to treat patients in a more cost effective way.

A GP referral is required to participate in the programme, which costs $90 per session and is subject to a Medicare rebate.

If you are interested in participating in September programme, please phone our Newmarket office 07 3356 8255  or email tbs@psychologyconsultants.com.au to register your details and speak with your GP about a referral.

For more information visit http://towardsbettersleep.wordpress.com

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Stigma and suicide-let’s get talking!

Posted on September 10, 2013 in Uncategorized - 0 comments - 0

candelAn Interview with Clinical Psychologist Dr Eve Klopper     World suicide prevention day- September 10 2013

Q: The theme for World Suicide Prevention Day in 2013 is “Stigma: A major barrier to suicide prevention.”  How does the stigma associated with suicide impede suicide prevention?

A: Unfortunately, many people are uncomfortable discussing or directly considering issues surrounding suicide.  This limits awareness of risk factors or “red flags” that someone may be suicidal, and can make people who are suicidal less likely to seek help.  Feeling rejected and isolated can increase the risk that a person who has previously attempted suicide will make another suicide attempt.  Social stigma can also isolate those who have lost a loved one to suicide.

Q: So how can we respond to this?

A: Key steps to reducing stigma include understanding why people attempt or commit suicide; being able to identify risk factors and warning signs and knowing how to respond; knowing how to respond to someone who has attempted suicide and knowing how to support those who have lost loved ones to suicide.

Q: Why do people attempt or commit suicide?

A: Suicide is sometimes seen as the “only way out” of unbearable psychological or physical pain.  This can include people experiencing severe mental illness, such as clinical depression or schizophrenia, or intense mental anguish, for example loss, shame or guilt, people facing extremely difficult life events, as well as those undergoing chronic or terminal physical illnesses.  Some other reasons for suicide include attempting to benefit others, expressing ambivalence about continuing to live, attempting to “send a message” or achieve an outcome by one’s death, or exercising control over the timing or manner of one’s death.

Q: What are risk factors and warning signs we should be aware of?

A: While some suicides are impulsive actions with no warning, others are planned carefully.  People feeling suicidal may or may not express their feelings to other people.  Factors which put a person at greater risk of considering suicide include having mental health difficulties, alcohol and substance abuse, being male, being isolated geographically or socially, experiencing financial stress or family violence or bereavement, and having attempted suicide previously or having a family history of suicide.  Warning signs that a person may be contemplating suicide include expressing the intention to harm or kill themself or saying goodbye to family and friends; preoccupation with death or dying; expressing strong feelings of hopelessness, of the pointlessness of living, of feeling trapped or of anger and revenge; withdrawal from other people; increased alcohol or substance use; undertaking reckless, risky or self-harming behaviours; dramatic mood changes, including suddenly changing from long-term depression to happiness; and extreme anxiety or agitation.  It is also important to be aware of the kinds of events which may “trigger” a person to commit suicide.  These include traumatic life events, relationship breakdown, job loss, diagnosis or recurrence of severe physical or mental illness, major change in life circumstances, financial or legal stress, and the death or suicide of a loved one or public figure.

Q: What can we do if we suspect someone is suicidal?

A: If you observe warning signs in someone you know, it is important to remain calm but act immediately.  Ask the person if they are feeling suicidal, whether they have made a plan to kill themselves and whether they have the means to carry out that plan.  Contrary to popular belief, talking calmly with someone in this way will not increase the chance of them carrying through with a suicide plan.  If the person has a clear plan and intends to carry it out imminently, call 000 or a health professional who can see the person immediately, or take the person to hospital.  Do not leave the person alone.  If the person is at lower risk of suicide, talk with them about their suicidal thoughts and help them to plan how they will stay safe, including assisting them to find appropriate support services.  Acknowledge their feelings but express your hope that, with help, they will be able to cope.

Q: How do we respond to someone who has attempted suicide?

A:  While it is normal to feel a range of emotions including shock, guilt and anger when a loved one has attempted suicide, providing acceptance, care and support can help them to recover and reduce the risk they will attempt suicide again.  Practical support includes encouragement to attend appropriate medical and psychological help, making sure the person cannot access means to attempt suicide again, if possible, preventing access to alcohol or drugs and assisting the person to manage re-building their lives, for example returning to work or school.  Providing such support can be psychologically tiring, so access help wherever possible.

Q: How does suicide affect loved ones, and how do we help those bereaved by suicide?

A:  Bereavement following suicide is usually intense and complex, including feelings of shock, disbelief, anger, guilt, sadness and shame.  Loved ones may have many “unanswered questions” and may also be experiencing trauma from discovering the deceased.  The most important thing we can all do to help is to express support and demonstrate our care.  We may feel awkward but it essential to say (or write) something to show our love and concern.  Let the bereaved person talk – when they are ready – and listen supportively.  Try to understand how they are feeling and allow them to grieve in their own way.  Be patient – understand that it may take years for the person to work out how to live with their loss.  Don’t avoid talking about the person who has died, but don’t press for details or make judgments – it is important to honour and accept both the person who has died and those left bereaved.  Offer practical support.  With children and teenagers, answer questions honestly and take their concerns seriously.  And remember – it is never too late to approach someone bereaved by suicide in the past and say “I didn’t know what to say to show you that I cared, and I’m sorry.  How are you going now?”

Q: What part can psychologists play?

A:  Psychologists can assist people who are feeling suicidal, and those who have attempted suicide, to address the causes of their pain and distress and to build their coping skills.  This includes providing treatment for mental illness, often in consultation with GPs or other doctors; providing coping strategies to manage life stressors or psychological or physical pain; and helping people to build relationships and social support networks.  Psychologists can also help those who have been bereaved by suicide to cope with grief and other emotional reactions, to build social support networks and to rebuild their lives.

Q: What should a reader do if they are feeling suicidal?

A: Please don’t suffer alone – help is available to you.  Tell someone you trust how you feel, or call one of the free, confidential counseling lines listed below.  If possible, stay with someone supportive.  Seek help from your doctor, a psychologist or another health professional.  Avoid drugs and alcohol, try to exercise and eat healthily.  You may find it helpful to write down your thoughts and feelings.  And if you need immediate, urgent help, call 000 or ask someone to take you to a hospital emergency department.

Q: Where can people get more information?

A: Confidential, 24/7 support is available at Lifeline: 13 11 14; Kids Helpline: 1800 55 1800; Mensline Australia: 1300 78 99 78 and the Suicide Call Back Service: 1300 659 467.

Useful information and further resources: www.wspd.org.au; www.livingisforeveryone.com.au; www.beyondblue.org.au

 

 

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Stigma and suicide-let's get talking!

Posted on September 10, 2013 in Uncategorized - 0 comments - 0

candelAn Interview with Clinical Psychologist Dr Eve Klopper     World suicide prevention day- September 10 2013

Q: The theme for World Suicide Prevention Day in 2013 is “Stigma: A major barrier to suicide prevention.”  How does the stigma associated with suicide impede suicide prevention?

A: Unfortunately, many people are uncomfortable discussing or directly considering issues surrounding suicide.  This limits awareness of risk factors or “red flags” that someone may be suicidal, and can make people who are suicidal less likely to seek help.  Feeling rejected and isolated can increase the risk that a person who has previously attempted suicide will make another suicide attempt.  Social stigma can also isolate those who have lost a loved one to suicide.

Q: So how can we respond to this?

A: Key steps to reducing stigma include understanding why people attempt or commit suicide; being able to identify risk factors and warning signs and knowing how to respond; knowing how to respond to someone who has attempted suicide and knowing how to support those who have lost loved ones to suicide.

Q: Why do people attempt or commit suicide?

A: Suicide is sometimes seen as the “only way out” of unbearable psychological or physical pain.  This can include people experiencing severe mental illness, such as clinical depression or schizophrenia, or intense mental anguish, for example loss, shame or guilt, people facing extremely difficult life events, as well as those undergoing chronic or terminal physical illnesses.  Some other reasons for suicide include attempting to benefit others, expressing ambivalence about continuing to live, attempting to “send a message” or achieve an outcome by one’s death, or exercising control over the timing or manner of one’s death.

Q: What are risk factors and warning signs we should be aware of?

A: While some suicides are impulsive actions with no warning, others are planned carefully.  People feeling suicidal may or may not express their feelings to other people.  Factors which put a person at greater risk of considering suicide include having mental health difficulties, alcohol and substance abuse, being male, being isolated geographically or socially, experiencing financial stress or family violence or bereavement, and having attempted suicide previously or having a family history of suicide.  Warning signs that a person may be contemplating suicide include expressing the intention to harm or kill themself or saying goodbye to family and friends; preoccupation with death or dying; expressing strong feelings of hopelessness, of the pointlessness of living, of feeling trapped or of anger and revenge; withdrawal from other people; increased alcohol or substance use; undertaking reckless, risky or self-harming behaviours; dramatic mood changes, including suddenly changing from long-term depression to happiness; and extreme anxiety or agitation.  It is also important to be aware of the kinds of events which may “trigger” a person to commit suicide.  These include traumatic life events, relationship breakdown, job loss, diagnosis or recurrence of severe physical or mental illness, major change in life circumstances, financial or legal stress, and the death or suicide of a loved one or public figure.

Q: What can we do if we suspect someone is suicidal?

A: If you observe warning signs in someone you know, it is important to remain calm but act immediately.  Ask the person if they are feeling suicidal, whether they have made a plan to kill themselves and whether they have the means to carry out that plan.  Contrary to popular belief, talking calmly with someone in this way will not increase the chance of them carrying through with a suicide plan.  If the person has a clear plan and intends to carry it out imminently, call 000 or a health professional who can see the person immediately, or take the person to hospital.  Do not leave the person alone.  If the person is at lower risk of suicide, talk with them about their suicidal thoughts and help them to plan how they will stay safe, including assisting them to find appropriate support services.  Acknowledge their feelings but express your hope that, with help, they will be able to cope.

Q: How do we respond to someone who has attempted suicide?

A:  While it is normal to feel a range of emotions including shock, guilt and anger when a loved one has attempted suicide, providing acceptance, care and support can help them to recover and reduce the risk they will attempt suicide again.  Practical support includes encouragement to attend appropriate medical and psychological help, making sure the person cannot access means to attempt suicide again, if possible, preventing access to alcohol or drugs and assisting the person to manage re-building their lives, for example returning to work or school.  Providing such support can be psychologically tiring, so access help wherever possible.

Q: How does suicide affect loved ones, and how do we help those bereaved by suicide?

A:  Bereavement following suicide is usually intense and complex, including feelings of shock, disbelief, anger, guilt, sadness and shame.  Loved ones may have many “unanswered questions” and may also be experiencing trauma from discovering the deceased.  The most important thing we can all do to help is to express support and demonstrate our care.  We may feel awkward but it essential to say (or write) something to show our love and concern.  Let the bereaved person talk – when they are ready – and listen supportively.  Try to understand how they are feeling and allow them to grieve in their own way.  Be patient – understand that it may take years for the person to work out how to live with their loss.  Don’t avoid talking about the person who has died, but don’t press for details or make judgments – it is important to honour and accept both the person who has died and those left bereaved.  Offer practical support.  With children and teenagers, answer questions honestly and take their concerns seriously.  And remember – it is never too late to approach someone bereaved by suicide in the past and say “I didn’t know what to say to show you that I cared, and I’m sorry.  How are you going now?”

Q: What part can psychologists play?

A:  Psychologists can assist people who are feeling suicidal, and those who have attempted suicide, to address the causes of their pain and distress and to build their coping skills.  This includes providing treatment for mental illness, often in consultation with GPs or other doctors; providing coping strategies to manage life stressors or psychological or physical pain; and helping people to build relationships and social support networks.  Psychologists can also help those who have been bereaved by suicide to cope with grief and other emotional reactions, to build social support networks and to rebuild their lives.

Q: What should a reader do if they are feeling suicidal?

A: Please don’t suffer alone – help is available to you.  Tell someone you trust how you feel, or call one of the free, confidential counseling lines listed below.  If possible, stay with someone supportive.  Seek help from your doctor, a psychologist or another health professional.  Avoid drugs and alcohol, try to exercise and eat healthily.  You may find it helpful to write down your thoughts and feelings.  And if you need immediate, urgent help, call 000 or ask someone to take you to a hospital emergency department.

Q: Where can people get more information?

A: Confidential, 24/7 support is available at Lifeline: 13 11 14; Kids Helpline: 1800 55 1800; Mensline Australia: 1300 78 99 78 and the Suicide Call Back Service: 1300 659 467.

Useful information and further resources: www.wspd.org.au; www.livingisforeveryone.com.au; www.beyondblue.org.au

 

 

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Posted on August 1, 2013 in Uncategorized - 0 comments - 0

IBS-There is hope for people suffering with this often debilitating condition. 

Clinical Psychologist  Dr Matthew Evans

Clinical Psychologist
Dr Matthew Evans

Matt Evans, Clinical Psychologist, has worked for several years in a specialist gastroenterology outpatient clinic providing psychological support services for people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Below he writes about what he has learned along the way.

There is hope for people suffering from IBS. Over the last decade, the evidence has mounted to support a variety of different pharmacological, non-pharmacological and psychological treatments to help with the management of this condition. Unfortunately, health professionals, sufferers and the general public are not fully aware of this evidence and IBS remains often misunderstood.

There are probably many people with IBS who could be feeling better, but, without the knowledge of some of these more recent findings, haven’t had the opportunity to access the kinds of supports that we now know might help. Below are a few findings that are well-worth knowing about and considering for people with IBS.

First, IBS is not as rare as some people might think. It has been found to affect about 1 in 10 Australians, although more than that suffer from unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms1. It is important to identify these problems to then access the appropriate treatments.

Second, the severity and impact of IBS varies from one individual to another; from quite manageable to almost intolerable. Despite this variation, studies have found that IBS has a significant impact on health-related quality of life with issues such as low energy/fatigue, role limitations caused by physical health problems, bodily pain, and negative general health perceptions being common consequences 2,3,4.

Third, IBS has clearly defined diagnostic criteria called the Rome criteria. In the past, clinicians tended to rule out all other possibilities before diagnosing IBS. This often involved lots of tests and procedures. With better definitions of IBS symptoms and improved identification of IBS, the need for extensive testing has decreased5,6. If concerned, see a doctor familiar with diagnosing IBS.

Fourth, it was originally thought that IBS was “psychosomatic”, which means caused by psychological distress. More recent research findings show that this is not the case. Although the exact cause of IBS not been identified, studies have now found reliable biological markers for the condition7. However, psychological distress does appear to make symptoms worse in people with IBS. Often distress about IBS symptoms can make those symptoms worse leading to more distress. Psychological treatments aim at helping patient break this “vicious cycle”.

Finally, it is no longer the case that there is nothing that can be done to help alleviate the symptoms of IBS. It is true that IBS is a chronic disease, in that it is ongoing and there is no cure. However, there exist several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments that have been shown to significantly help manage the symptoms and improve quality of life8,9.

There is also increasing research showing that psychological interventions can be effective. Despite not knowing exactly how they work, psychological interventions do seem to work in improving quality of life in people with IBS. Psychological interventions often recommended include cognitive behavioural therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy and hypnotherapy.

The American College of Gastroenterology, following their review of the research evidence for the treatment of IBS concluded, “use of psychological therapies can be strongly recommended for most patients in most circumstances”11 It is, of course, vital to have IBS properly assessed, diagnosed and medically treated. Psychological treatments can also offer added benefits that complement these medical treatments, providing further hope for people suffering with IBS.

References:

1 Lovell RM, Ford AC (2012). Global prevalence of and risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome: a meta-analysis. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol , 10:712-21.

2 Gralnek IM, Hays RD, Kilbourne A, Naliboff B, Mayer EA (2000). The impact of irritable bowel syndrome on health-related quality of life. Gastroenterology. Sep;119(3):654-60.

3 Chang L. (2004). Review article: epidemiology and quality of life in functional gastrointestinal disorders. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. Nov;20 Suppl 7:31-9.

4 El-Serag HB (2003) Impact of irritable bowel syndrome: prevalence and effect on health-related quality of life. Rev Gastroenterol Disord.;3 Suppl 2:S3-11.

5 Ford AC, et al. (2008).Will the history and physical examination help establish that irritable bowel syndrome is causing this patient’s lower gastrointestinal tract symptoms? JAMA, 300:1793-1805.

6 Ford AC, et al. (2009) Yield of diagnostic tests for celiac disease in subjects with symptoms suggestive of irritable bowel syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Intern Med, 169:651-58.

7 Ford AC, Talley NJ. (2011). IBS in 2010: advances in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol, 8:76-78.

8 Brandt et al. (2009). An evidence-based systematic review of the management of IBS. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 2009, vol 4, supp 1, s1-s25

9 Johannesson E, Simrén M, Strid H, Bajor A, Sadik R. Physical activity improves symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Gastroenterol 2011;106:915-22.

10 http://s3.gi.org/patients/ibsrelief/treatmentmatrix/treatment_matrix.pdf, pg2

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Getting out of our heads: ACT and Defusion

Posted on July 25, 2013 in Uncategorized - 0 comments - 0

By Clinical Psychologist Erika Fiorenza

Erika Fiorenza Clinical Psychologist

Erika Fiorenza
Clinical Psychologist

There is a great scene in Finding Nemo where Nemo’s dad, Marlin, and his newly found friend, Dory, have been swallowed by a whale and are holding on for their lives.

Dory: “It’s time to let go! Everything is going to be alright”

Marlin: “How do you know? How you know something bad isn’t gonna to happen?”

Dory: “I don’t!”

For me, this scene sums up Acceptance and Commitment Therapy or ACT.  It’s about opening up and accepting fearful or painful thoughts and feelings while taking action towards our values, which in Marlin’s case was love for his son Nemo.  In ACT, this is referred to as ‘Psychological Flexibility’.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, said “act”, is an evidence based therapy which teaches clients ways to handle painful thoughts and feelings and take action with full awareness of what is important.  One of the core processes taught in ACT is called ‘defusion’.

Our thoughts can often get in the way of living the life we want to live.  Thoughts can be like bullies – pushing us around, telling us what to do.  ‘Defusion’ means separating from our thoughts, and seeing them as just that – thoughts.  In ACT, we teach clients ways to look at, rather than from their thoughts.  We ask clients to look at what their mind is telling them.  For clients with depression, their mind may say things like “I’m worthless” and “what is the point”.  There are a number of exercises psychologists use to help teach the process of defusion.

A simple defusion exercise (Harris, 2009):

I invite you to think of a thought that may bully you around, and say that thought in the form of “I am X”. For example, “I’m a bad mum”

Now, in front of that thought say “I notice I’m having the thought that…” For example, “I notice I’m having the thought that I’m a bad mum”

What did you notice when you did this?

Painful or unwanted thoughts are part of being human.  It is important to emphasize that the aim of defusion is not to get rid of these thoughts, but to hold them lightly so they have less hold over us, and we can be present and engaged with our world.

I recommend checking out www.actmindfully.com for more on ACT and defusion, or the CD ‘Mindfulness Skill Volume 1’ which can be ordered from the site

Harris, R (2009). ACT made Simple. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Striving for control of food and body

Posted on July 11, 2013 in Uncategorized - 0 comments - 0

 

Psychologist Cathy Dart

Psychologist Cathy Dart

By Clinical Psychologist Cathy Dart

We are taught subliminally from a very young age that being thin is good.  Advertising, the media, celebrities and society place huge importance on physical appearance and the drive for perfection.

So it’s not surprising to hear that eating disorders affect 9% of Australian population and 15% of women. That is 2 million people across the nation experiencing an eating disorder (Eating Disorders Victoria, September 2012).

The statistic we don’t know is what percentage of Australian’s will seek medical help to resolve the eating disorder. Speaking to a Psychologist or Doctor about your eating disorder can significantly improve your quality of life but the first step is recognising that you have a problem.

Clinical eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia are very serious with life threatening health risks, they often require intervention from a family member and many years of medical help.

However, more recently clinicians have found that there is a much wider spectrum of non-clinical eating disorders that derive from body image distortion and a drive for thinness.

A ‘drive for thinness’ or in some cases overeating a ‘drive for self protection’ are often primary issues or impediments to recovery for a person with an eating disorder.

The person with an eating disorder often experiences significant alterations in their ability to rationally appraise their bodies. They actually feel and see a very different shape to what exists. Their feelings and thoughts about their bodies are nearly always extremely negative and critical.

Commonly the person with an eating disorder initially finds some benefit in their restrictive eating, overeating or compensatory behaviours that may include purging, exercise, laxative and diuretic abuse.  Ironically they may experience a noticeable decrease in other mental health issues including symptoms of anxiety, depression or low self-esteem.

Fuelled by an overwhelming drive to achieve very specific goals usually relating to eating, weight, sport, academic or vocational achievements the person may experience a sort of artificial euphoria associated with chemical changes and reduced circulation in the brain and body.  This affect is caused by “Starvation Syndrome.”

The first step to recovery is recognising that you have a problem, whether it is big or small. The next is asking for help and this is one of the most difficult steps for a person with an eating disorder.

Often awareness of the disorder can be very delayed for both the individual affected and their family and friends.  Health practitioners will often struggle to identify and/or achieve the patient’s agreement that there is a problem.

Patients have often said to myself and other health professionals “I thought it was all ok, I would stop when I was ready.  It was only when I couldn’t stop that I realised that it was a problem.”

Reversing starvation or poor nutrition alone does not ‘cure’ an eating disorder. The emotional relationship and psychological factors that contributed to the condition need to be addressed.

Shifting awareness and developing insight into the traps created by an eating disorder and/or severe body image distortion can be extraordinarily difficult for a person with eating disorder symptoms and their carers- but it can be achieved.

Establishing a network of support that may include an experienced psychologist, general practitioner, dietitian and psychiatrist is a critical factor in achieving wellness.

Carers and family members also play a very significant role in the recovery of a loved one with an eating disorder. Family Based Therapy involving the whole family in the recovery process is the primary evidence-based approach to intervention for children and teenagers.

It can also be very important for parents, partners and carers supporting a loved one with an eating disorder of any age to access their own support.  Regular appointments with an experienced psychologist who is aware of the complexities of eating disorders can be very beneficial.

For many persons with eating disorders meeting others with similar illnesses and joining in with the activities provided by community organisations can be an important step in reconciliation and recovery.

Some of the support services available here in Brisbane include:

The Butterfly Foundation. This is Australia’s only national charity for the support of people with eating disorders and their families and carers.  The Butterfly foundation is dedicated to bring about change to the culture, policy and practice in the prevention, treatment and support of those affected by eating disorders and negative body image.

http://thebutterflyfoundation.org.au

The Eating Disorders Association Inc (Qld) is a non-profit organisation funded by Queensland Health, to provide information, support, referrals and support group services for all people affected by eating disorders in the state of Queensland, Australia.  The EDA also provides tailored workshops for positive body image and eating disorders to schools, universities, health professionals and the community.

Telephone (07) 3394 3661 or 1300 550 236.

12 Chatsworth Rd, Greenslopes Q 4120.

http://eda.org.au

Isis – The Eating Issues Centre Inc.  Isis works therapeutically with women and men of all ages from 17 years onwards. 
As the majority of those with eating issues are women, Isis offers more women-focused time at the centre: 
Please telephone first before visiting.

Telephone (07) 3844 6055

58 Spring Street, West End 
Q 4101

 http://www.isis.org.au

Eating Disorders Outreach Service and North Brisbane Outpatients Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Program. EDOS is a publicly funded state-wide health service that plays a significant leadership role and service development in Queensland including a state-wide specialist consultation liaison service which facilitates patient access to local general medical and psychiatric facilities, and a specialist outpatient clinic for patients residing north of the Brisbane River.

Telephone (07) 3114 0809
Rosemount, Windsor QLD

www.health.qld.gov.au/rbwh/services/mental_health.asp

Additional information is available:

F.E.A.S.T. – Families Empowered And Supporting Treatment of Eating Disorders is an international organisation of and for parents and caregivers to help loved ones recover from eating disorders by providing information and mutual support, promoting evidence-based treatment, and advocating for research and education to reduce the suffering associated with eating disorders.

http://www.feast-ed.org

Australian and New Zealand Academy of Eating Disorders (ANZAED) is a the peak body for eating disorder professionals committed to leadership and collaboration in research, prevention, treatment and advocacy.

http://www.anzaed.org.au

If you are experiencing body image distortion or think you may have an eating disorder, Psychology Consultants can help you overcome what can be an all consuming, negative force in your life.

To see our full team of Psychologists visit: www.psychologyconsultants.com.au or call 3395 8633 to make an appointment.

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